Good Morning,.. As Long As You Love Me

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Best Google Easter Eggs

Google doesn’t shy away from a joke, and always make an appearance on April Fool’s Day. If you know where to look you will discover treats the company has hidden around the web. They have left many throughout the years, but only a few have stuck around.

Google Search

Google has the answers to any question you could possibly have, but sometimes the search engine itself likes to have a little fun.

Askew: When you search for the word “askew” or “tilt,” your window will do just that.

Barrel roll: If you ask Google to “do a barrel roll” your screen will do a 365 degree turn.

Bacon number: Kevin Bacon has done so much work in Hollywood that any actor can be connected to him in five steps or less through their work. Going through all the work every actor has done can be tedious, which is why Google took care of it for you. When you type in a celebrity’s name followed by “bacon number” you will see how connected that person is to the Footloose star.

Blink search: Cheeky searches don’t end there. Search for “blink html” and the results will blink at you.

Atari: This is the perfect way to play a game at work while pretending you’re just looking for an image. Google image search “Atari breakout” and find yourself in the middle of a game.

Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy: If you query Google about the “answer to life, the universe and everything” you’ll find the answer as defined by author Douglas Adams at the end of the Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy series: “42.” Someone at Google is apparently a huge Hitchhiker’s Guide fan because they also added a joke to the back of the Chromecast. In small print it says “H2G2-42,” which makes a reference to the title and the answer to the meaning of life.

The Loneliest Number: If you ask Google what the loneliest number is, it answers with the number one. Sigh. The same thing happens when you type “the number of horns on a unicorn,” and searching for a baker’s dozen brings up the number 13.

Retro Google: Take a step into a time capsule and see what Google looked like in 1998. Search for “Google in 1998,” and you can see what life was like almost 2o years ago.

Recursion: For those who don’t know, recursion is the process of repeating things in a pattern. Search for recursion and Google will ask you if you meant to say “recursion.” Get it?

Festivus: Jerry Seinfeld’s favorite holiday gets a shout out on the search engine when you type in Festivus. The plain aluminum pole will appear on the side.

Blue Moon: The phrase “once in a blue moon” means something only happens every once in awhile. Google figured out how often that actually is.

Nag a ram: An anagram is when you rearrange the letters in a word to create other words. When you search for the word, Google suggests you also look for “nag a ram.”

Language changes: Never to be outdone by Facebook, Google added humorous language changes. You can now search in Pirate or Swedish Chef language.

Posted from WordPress for Android on my Samsung Galaxy Note 3

Bluetooth Speaker Packed Full of Features on the Cheap

It’s no bank-breaking accessory for a smartphone or tablet, but one that I at least could not do without.
It’s loud, and sounds great; great-quality while loud, and has a solid-built quality touch to it- And it’s the iHome iBT16 mini Bluetooth speaker.

You can play audio using different connection methods with this speaker- and I’m going to go over them in this overview because everything else that needs to be said about the speaker, is all stated in the first two short sentences the begin this review, which earn it my 5/5 star rating.

iHome Bluetooth Rechargeable Mini Speaker Cube - Purple (iBT16UC)

iHome Bluetooth Rechargeable Mini Speaker Cube – Purple (iBT16UC)

Let’s start off with the coolest method of connecting; using NFC. My Samsung Galaxy Note 3 has NFC capabilities, as do many other phones and tablets. NFC (Near Field Communication) can be used for lots of other things, but in this case it’s basically just a shortcut to connecting to the speaker by pairing your phone to the speaker using Bluetooth. You can use NFC by holding the phone over the speaker for just 3-5 seconds. Then obviously there is just the Bluetooth connection method.

There is an AUX port so you can plug anything into its 3.5mm jack, and it’s bi-directional.
This is understated but importantly awesome!
Examples: Smartphone plugged into AUX port on speaker using a basic male-to-male 3.5mm cable plays whats on the phone; -AUX audio-in. But when I have my phone paired through Bluetooth to this speaker, I can then connect this speaker to my stereo with a 3.5mm to RCA (red & white) audio cable. So now it plays through this speaker but also through my home audio speaker system; -AUX audio-out.

The cable it comes with, 3.5mm and USB jacks on one side, and a micro USB jack on the other, adds another audio playback method. Plug the cable into your computer, laptop, etc, using the 3.5mm (headphone jack) and the USB to a free port, then the micro USB jack into the speaker and it not only charges it but plays audio from your computer through the speaker.

This all might not sound amazing but you’ve got at least 5 ways to connect, utilize, and/or get your music playing through this. NFC, Bluetooth, AUX-in, AUX-out, micro USB (When using the provided headphone jack and USB cable).

Favorite Feature: using the NFC to easily and quickly pair my phone and it’s Bluetooth to the speaker.

Best Utilization: This basically can and will make anything you have (older care stereo, home theater system, any stereo, or anything that can play audio and audio out to a 3.5mm jack) a wireless reviver. I plug this into my ancient, but great, TEAC receiver -and now its a wireless AND Bluetooth capable stereo system, with this as one extra little speaker!

What iHome has to say about their iBT16:

Rock with the Block | Bring the party where ever you go with the iBT16 mini Bluetooth speaker. Stream wireless digital audio via Bluetooth from your iPhone, iPad, Android, Blackberry and other Bluetooth-enabled devices. The iBT16 also has an aux line-in jack, as well as a line-out jack for an expandable audio experience.

Bluetooth

  • Bluetooth wireless audio

    Wirelessly connect your Bluetooth-enabled phone, iPad, PDA or computer

Rechargeable Battery

  • Built-in rechargeable battery

    Long-lasting internal lithium ion battery gives speakers plenty of power up to 8 hrs. (Initial charge 3-5 hrs.)

Sound Beyond Size

  • Single speaker

    Specially designed high-end driver delivers astounding clarity, depth and power in single speaker

  • Supplied cable for charging speakers and connecting to audio source

    2 -in-1 cable has a USB plug for charging speaker and audio plugs for connecting to audio source so you can charge speaker while listening

  • Aux line out jack to connect additional speaker

    Use single speaker for mono sound, or connect multiple speakers for a “wall of sound”

  • NOTE

    *NOTE: Additional cable required if using two speakers.

Additional

  • Durable rubberized cabinet finish

Watch “In My Place” by Kevin Seeger

Comcast; “We Don’t Give a F_ck”

BIRTHDAYS ARE SPECIAL, except..

BIRTHDAYS ARE SPECIAL, except they’re no longer anything to care about for yourself, after you’re 21st birthday – the ‘specialness’ is kinda over, that’s why you gotta make sure and say:

Hay!, it’s your birthday, and happy it up, and if you can’t, I’ll try to make it a happy birthday, unless it costs more then 4 dollars, that’s all i have

😉

article content written by ‘Kevin Seeger’ – originally published at http://www.KevinSeeger.info

Top Gear (BBC) – a Jeremy Clarkson, ‘uh-oh’

Ofcom examines Jeremy Clarkson’s Top Gear Myanmar joke

The show saw Clarkson (left) and his co-hosts face a series of challenges
The show saw Clarkson (left) and his co-hosts face a series of challenges

Media regulator Ofcom is investigating whether a recent episode of Top Gear, which included a controversial joke about Asian people, broke its rules.

Host Jeremy Clarkson used a derogatory term during the Burma Special, which was broadcast on BBC Two in March.

The show’s producer later apologised, but Ofcom is now looking into whether it breached its “content standards”.

The news comes after Clarkson was criticised for mumbling a racist word during an outtake from another episode.

The Ofcom investigation relates to a special programme in which the show’s hosts built a bridge over the River Kwai, on the border of Myanmar (also known as Burma) and Thailand.

Surveying the structure as a local man walked across it, Clarkson remarked: “That is a proud moment. But there’s a slope on it.”

Co-star Richard Hammond replied: “You’re right. It’s definitely higher on that side.”

‘Institutionally racist’

Equal Justice, a law firm specialising in discrimination cases, accused Clarkson of “clear gross misconduct” and said his comments made the BBC appear “institutionally racist”.

After receiving complaints, Top Gear producer Andy Wilman said it was “a light-hearted wordplay joke referencing both the build quality of the bridge and the local Asian man who was crossing it”.

He continued: “We were not aware at the time, and it has subsequently been brought to our attention, that the word ‘slope’ is considered by some to be offensive and although it might not be widely recognised in the UK, we appreciate that it can be considered offensive to some here and overseas, for example in Australia and the USA.

“If we had known that at the time we would not have broadcast the word in this context and regret any offence caused.”

If Ofcom decides its code has been breached “seriously, deliberately, repeatedly, or recklessly”, it can impose sanctions ranging from the broadcast of a correction or statement to a fine of up to £250,000.

The Ofcom investigation comes a week after the BBC faced calls to fire Clarkson after he mumbled an offensive part of the nursery rhyme Eeny, Meeny, Miny, Moe in a clip that was not broadcast.

The star said the corporation told him he would be sacked if he makes “one more offensive remark, anywhere, at any time”.

BBC © 2014 – Original article on BBC.com